Week 6: Eye Contact vs Airship Shape and Bristol Fashion

Airship300 Airship Shape and Bristol Fashion is published by Wizard’s Tower Press who also produced the tribute Colinthology. They are a curious publisher who specialise in science fiction and fantasy but don’t want submissions and won’t read them if you send any. This isn’t the only reason they have become a firm favourite, they are also very friendly and are big fans of the south west.

The short stories in the current Roz Clarke and Joanne Hall edited work are Bristolian from title to end. The title is a play on the phrase ‘shipshape and Bristol fashion’, a term dating from 1840 when talking about the treachorous port of Bristol. Its very high tidal range of 13m meant that if things weren’t tied down they would end up overboard.

Not only is the time period fitting to these stories but their genre seems surprisingly apt. “Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction that typically features steam-powered machinery, especially in a setting inspired by industrialized Western civilization during the 19th century.” It all makes for a very respectful tribute to this city. The following quotation from the introduction says it quite nicely:

Take a walk around Bristol, and history seeps from the walls. The city can claim more than its fair share of firsts, including the first iron-hulled steamship, the first female doctor, the first chocolate bar and the first use of nitrous oxide as an anaesthetic, the invention of the Plimsoll line, the first undersea telegraph cable, the world’s first test tube baby and the first transplant organ grown from stem cells, and a large share of the world’s first supersonic airliner. Now, from this fertile ground comes an anthology charting other realities and alternate histories, in a collection as rich and varied as the true history of this great British city.

— Gareth L. Powell

“Not bad for a little city” said Bristol Culture editor, Martin Booth,  when I read the above to him and he would add that Bristol is where Ribena was invented too.

Airship Shape and Bristol Fashion doesn’t shy away from the less glamorous aspects of the city such as its slavery connections and the tobacco industry but all is included in a rich Bristol setting.

Two excellent stories from its collection are Joanne Hall’s Brass and Bone which is based in Clifton and touches on the use of the Suspension Bridge in both folklore and local awareness.

The Girl with Red Hair, by Myfanwy Rodman is written so beautifully and hauntingly while making sure to use Bristol to its most picturesque best, never losing sight of its story. Not all the stories are as strong but all are true to their setting.

eyecontact Eye Contact by Fergus McNeill on the other hand is a debut novel published by the same company that has published Stephen King. They are big and they have money to spare. McNeill’s work is about a serial killer whose method of choosing victims is in the title.

It starts on Severn Beach with a body and then begins from the serial killer’s perspective in Clifton. There is a subtitle in parentheses – DI Harland Book I and it has a sequel, published in 2013, with its follow-up title DI Harland Book II.

As all slickly published and promoted books, these days, there is a trailer.

Eye Contact is set in Bristol but it has no love of the city. At least none more than a passing acquaintance because of the fact that it is set here. Clifton Down, Whiteladies and Starbucks feature prominently in the beginning and even after a walk up to the Clifton Observatory, and the obligatory mention of the Suspension Bridge there is no sense that these characters are part of their setting.

Clifton is an obvious choice of a setting for tourists and casual Bristolians but when a character in Airship Shape and Bristol Fashion visits a pawnbroker on Hobbs Lane then you know you’re reading someone who knows their city.

Eye Contact could be set anywhere without the story changing. The depth of the characters doesn’t go far enough to touch anything more than a curiosity about the plot. The writing is smooth, it’s slick and it’s glib. If you like Peter James then you’ll like Fergus McNeill, and if you love Jeffrey Archer then you’re in for a treat.

For the purposes of this tournament however, there is only one choice for the work that is shipshape and Bristol fashion and it’s the collection of short stories which references many airships. Not bad for a little publisher, who certainly outshone Hodder & Stoughton on this occasion.

Week 5: the Fair Fight vs the Accidental Proposal

Once again I got it wrong in the case of a book’s setting. The Accidental Proposal is set in Brighton, not Bristol. It wouldn’t have fared well against Freeman anyway so I won’t say any more about it.

The Fair Fight is Anna Freeman’s debut novel after completing her BA in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University and then her MA in Creative Writing at Manchester Metropolitan University. She is now a creative writing lecturer at Bath Spa University (where Nathan Filer also lectures).

Bristol, 1799. In Frog Lane, right in the city centre, is a brothel called the Convent and that’s where plain and unremarkable Ruth is born and raised. Destined to follow the profession of those around her she instead catches the eye of Mr Dryer, local merchant and boxing enthusiast.

Dryer takes Ruth under his wing and she soon makes a life as a female boxer – a pugilist – dropping more than her fair share of blood in the sawdust at the infamous Hatchett inn, where in modern times Freeman worked for six years.

On the other side of the class divide is genteel, rich, pockmarked and angry Charlotte, Dryer’s wife. She has lost most of her family to small pox, all except for her bullying brother who hides from the world and spends most of his time staring at the bottom of a bottle.

Freeman provides not only a level of emotional depth to her characters that makes them believable but her research adds some details which while not well-known ring true because they are based in reality.

She was inspired to write The Fair Fight after reading one of her nieces Horrible Histories books. She says “I had no idea that it happened but female prize-fighters used to write challenges to each other in newspapers. I read about Elizabeth Stokes who, in one example, answered Ann Field’s taunt with: “I, Elizabeth Stokes, of the City of London… Do assure her … that the blows I shall present her with will be more difficult to digest than any she ever gave her asses.”

Most women fighters were either prostitutes or suffering in poverty and while they may have made names for themselves in the ring, they had little value outside it.

Freeman’s research also encompassed reading diaries of Georgian women. “There are all these extracts from the diaries of spinsters and loads of them are so bitter and angry.”

There is an examination of injustice and personal power in the Fair Fight and quite a comprehensive look at the Bristol of the times. From schooling at St Michael’s Hill to the poverty in the dirty centre by the docks and the rich houses and families at Queen Square, there is a great sense that this take could not have taken place anywhere else. There is even a festival by the Harbourside which seems the ancestor of our current Harbour Festival.

The Fair Fight is not only a great Bristol novel but also one of the best books of the year.

Published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson on August 28.

Are blogger reviewers better than journalists?

I once read that any such question in the title of an article means that the answer is no. That’s true but only in the sense that the answer isn’t yes. I don’t think it’s even the right question but let me very quickly tell you why.

I was looking for a review of Naomi Wolf’s book Vagina and instead I found a bunch of highly politicised campaigns against Wolf and her pro-Assange stance. The newspapers hated her because they hated Assange and Wikileaks. I looked for blogger reviews but the book had only been pre-released to professional media bodies. Us bloggers had to wait. Even highly educated, rational and academic bloggers had to wait. It was these latter types that I wanted to tell me whether there was any merit to the book. Not the politicised journalists.

I decided then and there that book bloggers had no vested interests so were better than journalists.

I was then asked to review a restaurant’s new tasting menu and so were a few other bloggers and Bristol Bites who I don’t really consider a blogger but a professional foodie. She does it for a living. Some other bloggers did it mainly for fun and their reviews were more free and utterly uncensored. They were at times crass, badly spelled and just a poor reflection of blogging reviews.

At least that’s what my inner critic told me. Because with blogging, unlike with journalism at a newspaper or magazine where your livelihood depends on what you write, there is no one to judge what you should publish but yourself.

There’s no sub to check the spelling of the post you wrote in the spare couple of hours between sleep and work. There’s no editor to guide you in what’s acceptable and there’s no management to take the flak when you screw up. Bloggers probably haven’t read McNae’s media law and aren’t too fussed about being sued because hardly anyone is reading.

Week 4: Bristol Bells vs Where’s My Money?

In front of a low, old house, opposite St Mary Redcliffe and tall business buildings, there sat a thoughtful effigy of Bristol’s best known literary figure, the boy poet Thomas Chatterton. This figure is hidden whilst the house is being repaired but a plaque still helps identify the location.

Feeling disgruntled and under appreciated in his home town of Bristol, Chatterton left for London in 1770. Finding no luck there either his life came to a sad end by the time he was 24.

Since I have not included poets in this tournament, however, I would have had no need to mention him were it not for Emma Marshall.

Marshall, author in 1890 of Bristol Bells, and of over 200 more stories in her lifetime, liked to base her works around a famous figure and in this case it was Chatterton.

The story is also about Bryda, the beautiful and refined granddaughter of a farmer, who wants to follow the sound of the Bristol bells and leave her house in Dundry. When an old debt needs to be repaid she has no choice but to gain employment as a servant in the same house where Chatterton is apprenticed to a lawyer.

Marshall clearly, and fittingly to the story, outlines what is known of Chatterton’s sad and short life. Bristol Bells is a pleasant and short read with two stories running parallel. It is informative of one of the great literary figures of Bristol as she includes bits and pieces of his life and snippets if his poetry along with biographical information.

Much of the story takes place between Corn Street and Dowry Square with ventures to Hot Wells and St Vincent’s Rocks. There is a villain and a love interest, suspense and intrigue and a delightful introduction to the Bristol of 250 years ago.

Power of expression: 6/10
Bristol content: 11/15
Bristol integration: 9/15
Characterisation: 6/10
Total: 32/50

Mike Manson’s Where’s My Money, on the other hand, is a classic in contemporary Bristol fiction and as the cover suggests, it will indeed make you laugh out loud.

Max Redcliffe joins the Ministry of Work at the unemployment office on Union Street after having been on the other side of the counter for quite a while. His colleagues include Lee Woods and Ashley Hill and if you don’t recognise a couple of these names then you’re obviously not a Bristolian.

There is a wicked charm to Redcliffe’s story of his adventures in the unemployment office which while failing to deliver much of a narrative arc does provide lots of entertainment and information about the south west city.

From cider to slavery, tobacco to chocolate, the Downs and the Clifton Suspension Bridge, there is so much Bristol in its pages that this story could not have taken place anywhere else and yet the book does not feel overburdened with facts.

The Clifton Suspension Bridge, hanging by a thread across a vertiginous gorge, is one of the world’s most fabulous bridges, and it goes nowhere. There’s nothing on the other side of the bridge apart from a few big houses and a wood. The bridge is an expensive conceit. And rightly so. This golden gateway frames the Avon Gorge – transforming the landscape of grey cliffs and hornbeam woods into a sublime vision of grandeur.

Set in the 70s, it is funny and consistently Bristolian and manages to cover the decade pretty well too. The only thing that seems to have changed in 40 years is that we now have some great places for coffee. Three in fact. Oh and that the Bristol sound is no longer jazz.

Power of expression: 8/10
Bristol content: 15/15
Bristol integration: 13/15
Characterisation: 8/10
Total: 44/5020140727-220433-79473448.jpg

Week 3: the Sense of an Ending vs Infinite Skies

This week’s choices are a good opportunity to explore the definition of a Bristol novel. When I was crowd sourcing the books for my list, I tried to impose as few limits as possible so the long list could actually be long. There just aren’t that many works of fiction associated with Bristol.

I didn’t know whether having a Local author or setting or theme would be the appropriate criteria and I was open to going with whatever seemed right.

I ended up thinking that the novel itself had to represent Bristol culturally and physically. A Bristol novel wouldn’t just come from the domicile of the authors but would be the fictional space the city occupies in the creative world.

All of this is a roundabout way of saying that I left a book on the list because the author lived in Bristol and I didn’t check the setting.

Infinite Skies is a novel from the Young Adult genre, written by University of East Anglia’s Creative Writing MA alumnus Chelsey Flood. C.J. Flood is 29 and likes to work in the Bristol Central Library which also occupies a big part of my Bristol heart.

Unfortunately that’s about as Bristolian as the amble about Infinite Skies gets. Its protagonist Iris is 13 and her mother has just left their home to travel around and, presumably, find herself. Older brother Sam is struggling to cope and dad is having a hard time and it all gets worse when a group of travellers move in on the family’s land. The story is set near Derby and not in the south west at all.

Any kind of interest or suspense in the story is slowly killed off with the overwriting however and it feels like technique is prioritised, rather than used for effect, which is the wrong choice to make.

The characters are all likeable enough but the storyline is not strong enough to compel further reading.

I’m stealing from someone else when I say this but it’s relevant if not original: similes and metaphors are used to help the reader picture and understand a situation. With access to so much information, these days, the need for these literary techniques has been drastically reduced.

Flood fills most pages with constant description, similes and metaphors and when we finally got to a sunset looking like Chinese pork, I had to give up pretending I could stand it.

When each scene feels like a creative writing exercise then the story has taken second place.

Power of expression: 7/10
Bristol content: 0/15
Bristol integration: 0/15
Well written: 7/10

Total: 14/50

I am sad to say that Julian Barnes’ The Sense of an Ending is this week’s winner because I disliked it, a lot. However it does have some Bristol content.

A group of boys form a friendship in high school, go off to separate universities, something a bit dramatic happens with friendships and girlfriends and that’s the end of part one.

Part two starts consists of our much older protagonist revisiting the past because of a discovery. He spends a lot of time being tedious on purpose, as he tells us. He has an unpleasant and judgemental ex-wife with who he is still friends.

He isn’t particularly likeable and he is forced to face an unpleasant letter he wrote as a young man when his girlfriend left him for one of his best friends. It seemed a perfectly reasonable time to be unpleasant, if you ask me. If you can’t be vile at that point in your life, when can you be?

The plot is very boring and I expect Barnes thought he was being clever by putting in an irrational and erratic ex-girlfriend to show off the unexpected behaviour in the past that our hero/non -hero was not even aware of. I found her behaviour in the end more than a bit ludicrous and pointless.

I had to force myself to finish it but there were two points which I quite liked. One, there was a good use of the Clifton Suspension Bridge as both a Bristol tourist spot and a theoretical suicide location; and two, in one of the literary bits, Barnes pontificates on a philosopher’s wish to a newborn baby, “May you lead a boring life,” and this resonated with me.

Barnes got his wish but it’s not much of one to bestow on a newly born piece of fiction. This is a boring book with barely a hero’s journey to speak of.

In 2011, The Sense of an Ending won the Man Booker prize but then Obama was given the Nobel Peace Prize while keeping people locked up without charge in Guantanamo and killing more people while in power than Bush did. Awards are wrong all the time.

Power of expression: 5/10
Bristol content: 5/15
Bristol integration: 9/15
Well written: 6/10

Total: 25/50

Why writing is better than thinking

Laptop full of stickers - I didn't add those!

I’ve known a few psychology students and graduates but only one has said something that I still remember over a decade later.

We were talking about the difference between thinking and writing and she pointed out that you write linearly. Linear order forces your writing into some kind of structure, but thinking, as Tony Buzan has written about, is more creative and less ordered.

I’ve found this distinction to be useful for me. When thinking about subjects I start off trying to find a solution and then my mind goes all over the place, just one more permutation of what Buddhists call monkey mind.

When writing, though, I can strive towards an end, and follow a path. There is an evolution of an idea, a progression and an actual conclusion. And most probably this helps provide some understanding. Often I don’t know where the topic has come from and how it relates to me until I’ve written through and reached the end.

I don’t rate thinking too much and prefer meditation or waiting for my intuition to kick in but writing seems to help draw both of these processes out.

My 3-year-old computer-hog doesn’t allow me too much access to a computer so I’m trying to get as much writing done as possible on my phone and then tidy it up later.

This post on One Man and his Blog got me thinking about why I blog (when I get around to it).

On being thoughtful

I’ve not written about how tiring being a single parent was because I could’t find any way to describe it. How do you describe a state of exhaustion which makes you too tired to think of similes and metaphors?

And then I read a post On Wanting and new exactly how to describe it. Think about the exact opposite of wanting anything, being enthusiastic about anything.

That’s how tired I was. Mersina didn’t sleep through the night until she moved into her own room at two years and seven months old. That was about nine months ago.

It took about two months of mostly sleeping almost normally and then not every night until I felt well enough to feel enthused about things again.

I’ve not been thoughtful for a while on this blog and it’s mainly due to a lack of sleep and energy and wanting.

When the new little person arrives in a few months it might be a swift transition to not-wanting again but I’m not a single parent anymore so it may not be as bad. I don’t mind either way, it’s just nice to recognise the symptoms.20140714-190941-68981356.jpg

Week 2: The Shock of the Fall vs The Choice

Pitting Susan Lewis against Nathan Filer is like making Tweetie bird fight Muhammad Ali and I just don’t have it in me. Well, I do but I’ll do my best to keep as bloodless as possible.

filer_nathan_shock_of_the_Fall_140225a vs susan lewis_the choice

The Shock of the Fall describes the life of a boy from Bristol dealing with his grief at the death of his brother and experience of mental health care services for schizophrenia. The Choice is about a young girl (21, not 19 as the blurb says) who falls pregnant, falls out with her parents and then is confronted by a choice no parent should have to make.

Whereas Filer’s first book is sparse and clear, Lewis’s writing is filled with adjectives, adverbs and every possible type of description she could find.

There are mischievous eyes, eyes full of mischief and eyes of grey lead. Hearts surge, worried faces light up, voices soften with tenderness, or are husky with pride. Cliches fill the pages, serving no purpose other than to provide fodder for those who don’t have the time to turn on their television at midday and catch another made-for-TV-melodrama.

We don’t even find out what The Choice is until about 300 pages in to a 500 page novel and then every possible plot combination gets thrown in for good measure.

In direct contrast, Filer shows and never tells. As the writer he doesn’t presume anything about our understanding. Every word in the Shock of the Fall is direct and helps the story. He is a storyteller because he has a story to tell and nothing more. Lewis’s 26th* novel is an example of pulp publication where words are put in one after the other and spat out to people who just want to stay distracted for a few hours and aren’t too fussed about engaging and growing with their characters.

One thing Lewis does do well, however, is write about Bristol. It doesn’t matter whether the story requires it, and it seldom does, but if you read the Choice, you’ll find yourself finding out all about Brunel, Corn Street, Broadmead, the Banana bridge, the ss Great Britain, Southville, the Tobacco Factory and the Clifton Suspension Bridge. All are mentioned quite familiarly by the Bristol writer and are well written. They add nothing to the story, however. Lewis could just as easily have set her story somewhere else and it wouldn’t have changed a thing.

The Shock of the Fall is not inherently Bristolian but unlike Lewis, Filer touches on location only where he has to. The occasional mention of Kingsdown in passing doesn’t have to mean much but when his protagonist talks to a homeless man on the corner of Jamaica Street and Stokes Croft (not Cheltenham Road as he writes) we Bristolians, know exactly what he’s talking about and why it’s easy to make that mistake. The area adds to the story, to the characters, it needs no further explanation.

One of the most poignant scenes takes a Bristolian landmark and misses it. The protagonist Matthew Homes’ mother, tells him of how she had tried to find the Clifton Suspension Bridge when she was younger and in despair about what to do wanted to jump off it but ended up circling around Clifton instead. Bristol is integrated into the story, not an aside, not a random description. Filer does it beautifully. The Shock of the Fall won Best First Novel and Book of the Year at the 2013 Costa Book Awards.

The winner this week, Nathan Filer’s The Shock of the Fall, was never in doubt but it’s interesting to see that even though Lewis wrote pages and pages about Bristol, the snippets which Filer uses add more to a Bristolian sense of his work than constant references used as filler.

Week 1: Heartman vs Colinthology

Round 1, between Heartman and Colinthology, may be the most Bristolian of all because it is full of the paradoxes that make this city what it is. From spring to nearly winter there is a festival every weekend and one of the biggest celebrations took place yesterday at the very heart of St Paul’s and the setting of Wright’s Heartman.

Heartman by M.P. Wright published July 1, 2014 Colinthology300

Neither M.P. Wright nor Colin Harvey were born in Bristol and it is fitting that immigration and bringing home to a strange place fits in well with both our works.

Joseph Ellington, the main character in Heartman is from Barbados and it is the African Caribbean culture that all of the city was celebrating yesterday at St. Paul’s carnival whose theme was ’Home – Inna We Yard.’

‘Home’ means different things to different people but a true sense of home will encompass a feeling of one being at peace. African Proverb ‘When you are at home, your troubles can never defeat you’ Cape Coast, Ghana.

Heartman’s Ellington is an ex-cop forced to flee Barbados in tragedy. He finds himself in Bristol, 1965, unemployed in his family’s community in Bristol’s St. Paul and forced to take on a private investigation by a Jamaican councillor.

In pursuit of the truth he, and we, come across murder, drugs, racism and the community spirit and rich culture of the African Caribbean families that live in St Paul’s. What starts off as Ellington trying to make some money ends up with a race to possibly save the life of a vulnerable young woman.

Heartman is a story steeped in Bristolian settings, mannerisms and cultural outlets. There is a sense that it couldn’t have taken place anywhere else. From pubs in Montpelier, the city centre and St Paul’s, to lunch at the very white cafe at John Lewis in Broadmead, this is a work so well written and researched that it could be a major piece of evidence in the case for time travel.

Colinthology, on the other hand, is a collection of short stories published by Wizard’s Tower Press as a tribute to science fiction writer and avid Bristolian, Colin Harvey. Each story is preceded by a personal tribute to Harvey who passed away in 2011.

This moving publication is a symbol of one of the most Bristolian attributes of which I know, that sense of a community created as a second family in a bigger city. From Clifton to Stokes Croft, Bristol’s suburbs are so well-established that they seem little cities all of their own.

In the same sense, the stories in Colinthology range from a classic tale such as Nick Walters’ The Man Down The Road, so well structured and written that it could be found adapted as an episode from The Twilight Zone to Graham Raven’s Biz Be Biz, the opening story that has a bit too much detail of the new world it creates and loses sight of the actual plot.

Regardless of the quality of the stories, and some such as K.J. Jewell’s Newfangled are exceptional, Colinthology is worth reading because I don’t think you can understand the space fictional Bristol inhabits without the science fiction and fantasy component so aptly edited by Joanne Hall and Roz Clarke. It is this very community that convinced me I couldn’t run a book tournament without including short stories and so this is more a Bristol Book tournament than a novel one.

Some works in Colinthology are quite Bristolian in place settings and dialogue but here and there other parts fail – the length is too much for the sparse plot or the action could have taken place anywhere. One component that is common between both Heartman and Colinthology is the emphasis on pubs, ale and making the strange familiar.

Wright and Ellington are both fans of Dragon Stout chased by rum whereas Harvey was well known for his love of ales and many of the stories and tributes take place in pubs or the writers include a mention of the prized liquid where they can. So from the King William off King Street to the Garter and Star in St Paul’s, this round was lovingly Bristolian but in the end there was only one choice.

Heartman by M.P. Wright, published with great timing on July 1st by Black & White Publishing, is the winner of Round 1.

Many thanks to Wright’s publishers and to Wizard’s Tower Press who helped kick off our first week. Now here is a treat to help you decide whether you want to read our winner. [see the video trailer below]

All proceeds from the sale of Colinthology go to the charity Above and Beyond which helps improve patient care in Bristol’s hospitals.

Bristol novel rankings

Group 1 – The Elites

  1. Filer, Nathan – The Shock of the Fall (2013)
  2. Freeman, Anna – The Fair Fight (2014)
  3. Benatar, Stephen – Wish Her Safe at Home (1982)
  4. Brown, Chris – Guilty Tiger , Bovver (2002)
  5. Carter, Angela – ‘The Bristol Trilogy’ (link):Shadow Dance (1966), Several Perceptions (1968) and Love (1971) – Locarno Ballroom.
  6. Manson, Mike – Where’s My Money (2008)
  7. Wakling, Chris – The Devil’s Mask (2011)
  8. Burgess, Melvyn – Smack (or Junk) (2010)

Group 2 – Literary

  1. Barnes, Julian – The Sense of An Ending (2011)
  2. Byrne, Eugene – Things Unborn (2001)
  3. Nichols, David – Starter for Ten (2004)
  4. Cusk, Rachel – Arlington Park (2010)
  5. Butler, Paul – Cupids (2010)
  6. Trewavas, Ed – Shawnie (2006).
  7. Nicholson, Christopher – The Elephant Keeper (2009)
  8. Lee, Jonathan – Who is Mr Satoshi (2010)

Group 3 – Crime

  1. Wright, M.P. - Heartman (2014)
  2. McNeill, Fergus – Eye Contact (2012); Knife Edge (2013); Cut Out (2014)
  3. Carver, Caroline – Gone Without Trace (2007)
  4. English, Lucy – Selfish People (1998).
  5. Ferguson, Patricia – Peripheral Vision (2007); the Midwife’s Daughter (2012)
  6. Lewis,Robert – The Last Llanelli Train (2005)
  7. Hall, M.R. – The Coroner (Jenny Cooper 1) (2009)
  8. Prowse, Philip – Bristol Murder (2008)

Group 4 – Murder and Others

  1. Flood, C.J. – Infinite Sky (2013)
  2. Tessa Hadley – Clever Girl (2013)
  3. Hardy, Jules – Altered Land (2002)
  4. Hayder, Mo — Jack Caffery series – Birdman (2000); The Treatment (2002); Ritual (2008); Skin (2009); Gone (2010); Poppet (2012); Wolf (2014);
  5. Mason, Sarah – Playing James (2003)
  6. Moate, Jari – Paradise Now (2010)
  7. Johnson, Jeannie (pseudonym of Lizzie Lane) – A Penny for Tomorrow (2003).
  8. Gregory, Philippa – A Respectable Trade (1995)

Group 5 – Short Stories mostly

  1. Clarke, Roz and Hall, Joanne (Ed.)- Colinthology (2012)
  2. Clarke, Roz and Hall, Joanne (ed) – Airship Shape & Bristol Fashion (2014)
  3. Harvey, Colin – Future Bristol (Ed.) (2009)
  4. Harvey, Colin - Dark Spires(Ed.) (2010)
  5. White, Tony – Missorts Volume II (2013)
  6. Maughan, Tim – Paintwork(2011)
  7. Boyce, Lucienne – To the Fair Land (2012)
  8. Lewis, Susan – The Choice (2010)

Group 6 – Historical and sagas

  1. Marshall, Emma (1830-1899) – inc. Bristol Bells (the story of Chatterton), Under the Mendips, In Colston’s Days and Bristol Diamonds
  2. Smollett, Tobias – The Expedition of Humphry Clinker (1771)
  3. Stevenson, Robert Louis – Treasure Island (1883)
  4. Burney, Fanny – Evelina (1778)
  5. Lane, Lizzie – Wartime Brides (2012)
  6. Steen,Marguerite – The Sun Is My Undoing (1941)
  7. Young, E.H. – The Misses Mallett (1922). William – A Novel ().
  8. Butler Hallett , Michelle – Deluded Your Sailors (2011)

Group 7 – Bits and Pieces

  1. Douglas, Louise - In Her Shadow (2012)
  2. Dunn, Matt – The Accidental Proposal (2011)
  3. Smith, Zadie – Martha and Hanwell(2005)
  4. Le Carre, John – Our Game (1995)
  5. Moggach, Deborah – These Foolish Things (2005), You must be sisters (1978)
  6. Godwin, John – Children of the Wave (2010)
  7. Mayhew, Daniel – Life and How to Live it (2004).
  8. Ames, Laurel – Castaway (1993)

Group 8 – the Unknowns

  1. Bouzane, Lillian – In the Hands of the Living God (1999)
  2. Random, Bert – Spannered (2011)
  3. Rowbotham, Michael – Shatter (2009)
  4. Sheers, Owen - Pink Mist (2013)
  5. Mitchell, Diane – Tainted Legacy (2012)
  6. O’Brien, Maureen – Dead Innocent (2004)
  7. Myles, Josephine – Pole Star (2012)
  8. Archer, Jeffrey – Only Time Will Tell (2011)