Let’s have city sanctuaries instead of city farms

City farms were introduced in the 1980s so that children could see where their food came from, a friend was recently telling me as she munched on her bacon sandwich. As an Australian living in the UK, I like this view of the world as ‘other’ as something I can observe and not have it affect me as my direct experience.

“Since the early days in the 1960s and 70s there are now more than 120 city farms and school farms, nearly 1,000 community gardens and a growing number of community-managed allotments. They help to empower people of all ages and backgrounds to build better communities, often in deprived areas.”

And these farms seem to be doing their job quite well. Kids now probably realise to a great extent that to enjoy their tasty sandwiches they have to kill things, or be happy with killing things. Farms tell us that food needs to be killed. These animals are food. Farms make that point very clearly.

What if, instead of ‘animals=food’ we had animal sanctuaries in our cities? What if we protected living beings and taught children and adults that animals are there to be protected and cherished and helped, just like we should be doing with other humans too?

I completely agree with the Animal Welfare Party and their point 2.5, that City farms and sanctuaries, large animal companions, and working animals

Large animals are sometimes kept at city farms, as companion animals or working animals. City farms
should operate as animal sanctuaries, where animals are not sent to slaughterhouses.
• Allowing rescued animals to live out their lives should be the main focus of city farms, together
with education.

There is a lot more to these farms, however, which is why I think the idea of sanctuaries is not so improbable.

[More tomorrow.]

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