Tag Archives: crochet

Advent crochet blanket – 24 days of crochet patterns

Advent Crochet Blanket

[Dec 2, Update: Day one picture, hook size, yarn; Day two pattern and picture; Day three; Day four; Day five; Day six]

With no Advent Calendar of my own to keep me busy, I thought I’d post on 24 days of crocheting. A couple of years ago I wrote up 24 patterns but haven’t put it together well enough to publish as an actual pattern so I thought I’d post here. I’ll update this post daily for the 24 days of Advent.

Day 1 — Crochet candy cane square

Wool or a non-stretchy cotton/linen/bamboo DK. The bigger the yarn, the bigger the blanket.

Hook 4.5mm.

Dc = Double Crochet
Sk = Skip
Sl St = Slip Stitch
Sp/Sps = Space/Spaces
St/Sts = Stitch/Stitches
Chain 20 loosely.
Row 1: Dc in fourth ch from hook and in each ch across. (18 dc)
Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as first dc, now and throughout), turn; dc in next 17 sts. (18 dc)
Row 3: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 5 sts, ch 2, skip next 2 sts, dc in next 10 sts. (16 dc)
Row 4: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 8 sts, ch 2, skip next st, dc in ch-2 sp, dc in last 6 sts. (16 dc)
Row 5: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 6 sts, dc in ch-2 sp, ch 2, sk next st, dc in last 8 sts. (16 dc)
Row 6: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 6 sts, ch 2, skip next st, dc in ch-2 sp, dc in last 8 sts. (16 dc)
Row 7: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 8 sts, dc in ch-2 sp, ch 2, sk next st, dc in last 6 sts. (16 dc)
Row 8: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 4 sts, ch 2, sk 2 sts, dc in next 4 sts, ch 2, sk 1 st, dc in last 5 sts. (14 dc)
Row 9: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 4 sts, dc in ch-2 sp, ch 2, sk next st, dc in next 3 sts, ch 2, sk ch-2 sp, dc in last 5 sts. (14 dc)
Row 10: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 4 sts, dc in ch-2 sp, ch 2, sk next st, dc in next st, ch 2, sk next st, dc in ch-2 sp, dc in last 6 sts. (14 dc)
Row 11: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 6 sts, 2 dc in ch-2 sp, dc in next st, 2 dc in ch-2 sp, dc in last 6 sts. (18 dc)
Row 12: Ch 3, turn; dc in next 17 sts. Finish off. (18 dc)

 

Day One pattern, candy cane

 Day 2: Classic Granny Square

TR – triple

CH – chain

Chain 5. Join with a slip stitch.
Round 1: Ch 3 – counts as first triple (TR); Make 2 TR into the ring; (Ch 3, 3 triples into ring) times 3; Ch 3 and join to first triple with slip stitch;
Round 2: turn; Ch 3 — into the 3-chain space, make 2 TR into the same space; chain 3; 3 TR into the same 3-chain space;
Ch 1, 3 TR into the next 3-chain space, Ch 3, 3 TR stitches in the same 3-chain space;
Ch 1, 3 TR stitches into the same chain space, ch 3, 3 TR.
Ch 1, 3 TR, ch 3, 3 TR, join to the first “ch 3”;

Round 3: turn; Ch 3 — into the 3-chain space, make 2 TR into the same space; ch 1; 3 TR into the next 3-ch space [a corner]; Ch 3, 3 TR; ch 1; 3 TR into the next 3-chain space [non-corner];
continue by crocheting 3 TR – ch 3 – 3 TR in the corners, 1 TR in the chain spaces that are not corners.
When you are at the first chain space of this round: 3 TR, ch 3, join to the first ch 3.

Continue with the rounds until you have added enough to your granny square to make it the same size as the Day 1 square.

 

Day two pattern, Granny Square

Day 3: Crochet Square – through the back loop

Chain 20;
Note: Crochet each triple (TR) through the back loop.
Round 1: Ch 3 – counts as first TR; TR into each of the chains. Turn.
Repeat Round 1 twelve times or until it is the same size as the squares from the previous days.
Optional: slip st through each st to finish off.

Day three, triples through the back loop.

Day 4 – solid granny square

Ch – chain
TR – triple
Sl st – slip stitch
Ch 4, then join with a sl st to form a ring.
Round 1: Ch 5 (counts as first TR and ch-2)
Work 3 TRs into the ring, ch 2 (1st TR-group)
Work 3 TRs into the ring, ch 2 (2nd TR-group)
Work 3 TRs into the ring, ch 2 (3rd TR-group),
Work 2 TRs into the ring, insert hook into 3rd chain of the initial ch-5 and sl st to close the round.
Turn it around and tug firmly at the yarn to tighten it up.
Round 2: You should have 4 lots of TR-groups. And four ch-2 corner spaces.
Insert your hook into the corner space directly to the left of where you just finished round 1. Yarn over and work a slip stitch.
Ch 5 (counts as 1 TR plus ch-2 space)
Work 2 TRs into the corner space.
Work 1 TR into the top of the first st after the corner space.
Then work 1 TR into each of next 2 sts. Your first side is done.
Into the next corner space, work the following, 2 TR, ch-2, 2 TR.
Work 1 TR into each of the next 3 sts, then (2 TR, ch-2, 2 TR) into the next corner space. That’s your second side and corner group made.
Work 1 TR into each of the next 3 sts, then (2 TR ch-2, 2 TR) into the next corner space.
Work 1 TR into each of the next 3 sts and that completes your fourth side.
Work 1 TR back into the very first corner space (it should sit right next to the ch-5 that you made in the beginning).
Make a slip stitch into the third stitch of the first chain-5.
Round 3:
Insert your hook into the corner space directly to the left of where you just finished round 2.
Yarn over and work a slip stitch.
Chain 5.
Work 2 TR into the corner space.
Work 1 TR into that first stitch, then 1 TR into each of the next 6 stitches.
Into the next corner space, work (2 TR, ch-2, 2 TR).
Work 1 TR into each of the next 7 stitches,then (2 TR, ch-2, 2 TR) into the next corner space.
Work 1 TR into each of the next 7 stitches, then (2 TR, ch-2, 2 TR) into the next corner space.
Work 1 TR into each of the next 7 stitches, then 1 TR back into the first corner space so that it sits right beside the chain-5 you made at the start.
Sl st into the 3rd chain of the beginning chain-5 to close the round.
Your Solid Granny Square is now done.

 

Day 5: Mitered Square

Chain 30 or 40 for a bigger square.
Round 1: Use the back loops only, DC in each st.
Round 2: Chain 2, DC each stitch using the back loops, and skip the two middle stitches.
Repeat round 2, and keep decreasing in the middle.
Once you get to the last three stitches, draw up a loop in each of the three stitches and pull it through all four loops to finish.

Day 6: c2c square

TR is UK terminology; for US, use DC.
Chain 6.
Row 1 (Right Side): TR in 4th ch from hook and in next 2 ch; turn – 1 block made.
Row 2: Ch 6, TR in 4th ch from hook and in next 2 ch, (slip st, ch 3, 3 TR) all in ch-3 space of previous row; turn – 2 blocks made.
Row 3: Ch 6, TR in 4th ch from hook and in next 2 ch, [(slip st, ch 3, 3 TR) all in next ch-3 space of previous
row] twice; turn – 3 blocks made.
Row 4: Ch 6, TR in 4th ch from hook and in next 2 ch, [(slip st, ch 3, 3 TR) all in next ch-3 space of previous row] 3 times; turn – 4 blocks made.

So far, the rows have been increasing the amount of blocks. It’s now time to reduce them in order to make a square shape.

Row 5: Slip st across first 3 TR, * (slip st, ch 3, 3 TR) all in next ch-3 space of previous row; repeat from * to last ch-3 space; slip st in last space; turn, do NOT make a block in last space.

Repeat Row 5 until you have a square.

Day Seven: Peephole Chevron Stitch

Chain 22 (multiple of 10 sts + 2)
Row 1: Skip 2 chains (count as 1tr), 1tr into each of next 4 chains, *skip 2 chains, 1 tr into each of next 4 chains, chain 2, 1tr into each of next 4 chains; rep from * to last 6 chains, skip 2 chains, 1 tr into each of next 3 chains, 2tr into last ch, turn.
Row 2: Chain 3 (count as 1 tr), 1tr into first st, 1tr into each of next 3sts, *skip 2sts, 1tr into each of next 3 sts, [1tr, 2ch, 1tr] into Chain-2 sp, 1tr into each of next 3 sts; rep from * to last 6 sts, Skip 2 sts, 1tr into each of next 3 sts, 2tr into top of tch, turn.
Rep row 2 for desired length.

Every Which Way Crochet Borders by Edie Eckman

With crochet, a title such as Every Which Way Crochet Borders is beautifully literal. The borders are delicate, colourful, and well explained. The explanations are clear and concise. There is some preparatory content before the borders are written out in patterns.

There are 139 new border designs with step-by-step instructions and symbol charts. The instructions are clear enough for beginner crocheters, and the patterns are creative and fun enough for more advanced hookers.

The styles are creative and fresh, which is brilliant in crochet because there is so much information and so many patterns already out there. I loved this book and would buy it myself. I’d use it for knitting and crochet projects.

Every Which Way Crochet Borders by Edie Eckman is out now.

Crocheted rib cowl

Not sponsored and even though I mention brand names, there are no affiliate links or anything of the sort

I’ve not written much about any type of craft recently but thought I would mention this new crocheted rib cowl that I’m making for the second time.

I started to crochet less than a year ago because I was looking to make a baby blanket and I wanted to make one like the ones my friends Kimberlee and Mouse made for their babies. I couldn’t find any knitting patterns that were similar and then discovered Granny Squares. It was a bit of a revelation. Well, for the next 11 months or so, I didn’t know there was more to crocheting than Granny Squares. I bought lovely yarn and made many. At some point I moved on to another project and part of the reason was that my baby had arrived and her wonderful auntie Jenny had already crocheted her a perfect blanket herself so I wasn’t as motivated as I had been.

Lois's baby blanket from Auntie Jenny

The granny squares are still unjoined but I learnt to love crochet.

I have found that it’s easier for me to crochet than knit because the project isn’t as likely to unravel. When I’ve crocheted enough, I take out the hook, pull the loop to make it longer, and put it all away for another day. With knitting, and especially lace knitting, there is so much that can go wrong and with my sleep deprivation and lack of energy, I just couldn’t find it in me to make some of the more creative stuff.

Crochet seems to be more comforting, mindless (depending on the pattern – see Sophie’s Universe) and quicker for me.

Unlike with knitting, where I already knew some of the basic stitches, I found crocheting harder in terms of learning the physical process of it. There was a proper learning curve with in-built frustration and lots of repetition required to perfect / learn the techniques. I could create a chain with no problem but then making the magic circle was incredibly tough for me and also learning how to hold the yarn with the right amount of tension.

I used two books I borrowed from the library and plenty of YouTube videos. I still couldn’t do a magic circle until I found a new technique from one of the most amazing CALs (crochet a long’s) I’ve ever been part of and read. Hours and hours of work have contributed to this tutorial for the Sophie’s Universe project. Also, this Facebook group of crocheters is genuinely the nicest group I’ve belonged to. There is rarely any arguing at all and the members spend a lot of time supporting each other and praising everyone’s work. It also represents a hell of a lot of countries.

So here we are to the mindless but great crocheted rib cowl:

 

Crocheted rib cowl in Skeino

Finished rib cowl in Skeino

 

I had some luxurious and beautiful yarn by Skeino that I wanted to make sure I used up so I found something that I thought would be easy and that I would wear. I mainly scrolled through Pinterest while nursing Lois.

 

yarn skein

Skein of Skeino from Yarnbox March

 

 

IMG_6564

Half-way through the Skeino crocheted rib cowl

I am now making the same cowl but with Manos del Uruguay yarn from the Clasica range.

 

boxed yarn

Manos del Uruguay yarn, Clasica, from Yarnbox April shipment

IMG_6563

Crocheted rib cowl in Manos Clasica

IMG_6563

Half-way through crocheted rib cowl in Manos Clasica

I’m not sure it’s turning out as nicely so will see. I may even try to find a different pattern but so far the actual crafting itself is nice.

After writing this I remembered a competition that Deramores had for blogging about a trend and the chance to win £500 worth of yarn. The competition is now closed but there are six blog posts about different trends and the rib cowl is one of the ones written about – crocheting that looks like knitting. If you’re interested, the blogs are here. They seem to be great crafty blogs too.